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JDSDSGN

jeremy davis smith
But it’s cool…

But it’s cool…

Make Work.

Make Work.

Dynamic logos at the BCA gallery. Part of MFA thesis project on dynamic logos and the ever evolving relationship of brand and audience.
Showing until September 29.

Dynamic logos at the BCA gallery. Part of MFA thesis project on dynamic logos and the ever evolving relationship of brand and audience.

Showing until September 29.

Logo and image for Basic Brains single off upcoming album Ghostworld.

Logo and image for Basic Brains single off upcoming album Ghostworld.

Assignment: take the 200 page transcript from the Scope’s (Monkey) Trial of 1925 and create a one page composition summing up the event.

Assignment: take the 200 page transcript from the Scope’s (Monkey) Trial of 1925 and create a one page composition summing up the event.

"To make the pond ripple, you must throw a stone."
Illustration by JDS.

"To make the pond ripple, you must throw a stone."

Illustration by JDS.

MFA Thesis Intro

I am exploring the possibilities of the logo to become more dynamic and engaging through digital capabilities including time based animation, programming, and the unfolding of brand.

The static logo is the most effective form of branding in media today. Tomorrow, it will be the dynamic logo. 

The logo is the most identifiable aspect of a brand. It defines the company as much as the business they do. Why should it merely sit on the page? A brand is a living, evolving thing and represents more than a static mark. It should therefore be represented as more.

Animation allows the presentation and unfolding of the brand. It invites you in, introduces itself, pours you a cup of tea, shares a bit of its personality.

What I propose is a body of work experimenting with logo presentation and interactivity. I’d like to explore a number of new media tools such as Flash, After Effects, and HTML5. I’d also like to include elements of audio creation and editing.

Any logo can be animated but should it be?

What I propose is not merely adding motion to brands, but adding personality and depth. Creating logos has always been a passion of mine. Lately, I’ve stumbled into a couple freelance situations where I’ve animated logos. I looked at the process not as adding motion, but adding meaning. This requires a deep understanding of the business, the representation of that business through logo design, the brand personality, values, goals, as well as an understanding of the context it will be featured in, and the audience perceiving it.

What I hope to accomplish is actually not far off from my original direction. I’m looking at the transition of a very print-centric device toward digital application. What this will do is expand the dialog between brand and enthusiast. It will allow greater expression of brand values and personality as well as greater flexibility in the context it is featured in.

Through rigorous exploration and prototyping I hope to uncover a set of universals—a language of dynamic logography. I wouldn’t be surprised to find that no such set of principles exists, that each brand is unique and requires specific understanding, development, and expression. But, I hope to be surprised.

website super sneak preview: #wireframe

website super sneak preview: #wireframe

Base and Peb Mixtape cover.

Base and Peb Mixtape cover.

Being a creative person (and professional) demands a constant flow of brilliant ideas. This expectation demands flexibility. If an idea isn’t coming, it’s no excuse to miss a deadline. It’s an organic process that can be nurtured but not forced.

So where do ideas come from?

Although there’s no quantifiable formula that leads to ideation for me, certain situations tend to help the process. I came up with this list of ingredients that help me grow an idea. You might find them useful also.

Inspiration. Identification. Information. Iteration. Immobility. Interaction.

Inspiration. I watch TED talks, look at artists online, watch films, listen to music, and go outside. Inspiration is everywhere. I like to look closer. Look around.

Identification. Know thy audience. Imagine who this is for. What problem does a group have? What can you do for them? What’s been done well? Poorly? Find problems.

Information. I try to learn as much as possible of relative topics. Start with basic stuff and go deeper. Sometimes I like to pack as much into my brain as possible, walk away, and see what happens when I come back. Research.

Iteration. Especially when designing, I like to keep a breadcrumb trail of the iterations that I’ve executed. Sometimes looking back at an early concept, pared with more developed work will result in a new direction. It’s also easier to remember what doesn’t work (and prove it to clients without reenactment). Try everything.

Immobility. I try to be aware of my progress and keep things moving. If I’m just staring blankly for hours, odds are, I’m going to continue doing that. I’ll move on to something else, take a break, smash dinnerware, or watch lolcat videos. Anything but staring at the same screen for extended periods. Keep it moving.

 Interaction. Talking to people about your thinking can have amazing results. Almost anytime you go through the process of explaining something, it helps your own understanding of the subject in general, and may spark something you’ve overlooked. Other times, the person you’re conversing with will have the missing half of your idea. Talk to people.

Again, there’s no instant formula for consistently creating good ideas. I find these concepts helpful, but they don’t work for everything. Sometimes what an idea needs most is time: Incubation.

Still love these photos from last summer. Something about them just feels right. Or wrong—the strangeness of perspective kind of throws you off. Visually stimulating nonetheless.

Covers I designed with Principal Dean for his Confessions Beat Tapes. Entire catalog of ridiculous beats streaming @ http://principaldean.bandcamp.com/. Check it out.